Thank you, Peter, Teacher in the Ukraine for the Inspiration.

Why Not Engage your Students or Family in Weather Experiments?

MC Fairy surrounded by raining cats and dogs.

Last week I heard from a reader in the Ukraine! 

Hi there,

I’m Peter, and I’m a primary school teacher. I came upon your page when I was searching for lesson resources. It was quite interesting because I always wonder what approach would teach and entertain children the best way!

I followed some sites dedicated to kids development you shared, and I was really interested in them. But, I wanted to find more engaging games or crafts to do for learning. Then I found exactly what I wanted!

I suggested you’d be excited with it too, so that’s why I’m sharing the page: 
https://www.climacell.co/weather/blog/weather-activities-for-kids/

If you’ll find it useful for your website and your readers, you could add it as an additional source on your page, it’ll be helpful for so many teachers like me!

Please let me know what do you think?

Thanks for helping!

Kind regards,

Peter

I responded with:

Hi Peter,

So glad you enjoyed the links posted AND thanks for digging deeper and sharing this one. I love the series of weather experiments. They did a good job clearly outlining the methods, materials, target age group and provided concise explanations. This will be helpful. I’m going to do a separate post this week featuring this site.

Yes, it’s so important to make learning fun and engaging the kids in hands-on activities and that we as teachers take on the role of provocateur instead of teller. The question why is essential. Or the reflection if this happens then what do you think will happen next? Or what could we do to change/improve/extend the experiment?

  • What grade are you teaching?
  • Are you teaching virtually?
  • Where do you teach?
  • How long have you been teaching?
  • Are you enjoying it?

Godspeed on your education journey. It’s a beautiful fulfilling career!

Mary Catherine

The response brought a smile. The world is not that small!

Great to hear from you! So appreciated approach to blogging, such a responsibility!

It happened (regarding the exchange program), I teach in Ukraine now. From the start of the year, children went to school, then the decision was changed and we connected via Zoom. But now we again teach at school, the new statement appeared a few weeks ago. I teach 1-4 grades, kids are so active in these ages, I guess you know it! And I love their curiosity, that’s why I chose my field and never regretted it. I’ve been teaching for 6 years, hope I won’t face emotional burnout 🙂

Keep up the great work and I’d love to hear from you, Mary!

Regards,

Peter

Peter, all of us teachers can certainly relate to your reflection on hoping not to burnout emotionally. It is such an exciting and fulfilling career, but it does have a high level of stress. I think the most important thing to remember is that we do what we can and then have to let go and trust the universe to guide and watch over us.

Thank-you Peter, for sharing the link from Climacell that provided a clear and engaging listing of easy weather science experiments for elementary grades. Given climate change plus the natural change of seasons (here in Canada we are entering winter) these experiments allow children to extensively investigate many aspects of weather.

To take it a step further it would be great for children to research the topic of climate change.

The following is a listing of links that can support climate change research:

There are so many more available online. A very rich topic to investigate. I really want to highlight this link in particular as it has many interesting subtopics with corresponding links.

Enjoy friends and thanks again Peter!

MC Fairy shoveling snow.

Thank you, Peter, Teacher in the Ukraine for the Inspiration.

Why Not Engage your Students or Family in Weather Experiments?

Last week I heard from a reader in the Ukraine! 

Hi there,

I’m Peter, and I’m a primary school teacher. I came upon your page when I was searching for lesson resources. It was quite interesting because I always wonder what approach would teach and entertain children the best way!

I followed some sites dedicated to kids development you shared, and I was really interested in them. But, I wanted to find more engaging games or crafts to do for learning. Then I found exactly what I wanted!

I suggested you’d be excited with it too, so that’s why I’m sharing the page: 
https://www.climacell.co/weather/blog/weather-activities-for-kids/

If you’ll find it useful for your website and your readers, you could add it as an additional source on your page, it’ll be helpful for so many teachers like me!

Please let me know what do you think?

Thanks for helping!

Kind regards,

Peter

I responded with:

Hi Peter,

So glad you enjoyed the links posted AND thanks for digging deeper and sharing this one. I love the series of weather experiments. They did a good job clearly outlining the methods, materials, target age group and provided concise explanations. This will be helpful. I’m going to do a separate post this week featuring this site.

Yes, it’s so important to make learning fun and engaging the kids in hands-on activities and that we as teachers take on the role of provocateur instead of teller. The question why is essential. Or the reflection if this happens then what do you think will happen next? Or what could we do to change/improve/extend the experiment?

  • What grade are you teaching?
  • Are you teaching virtually?
  • Where do you teach?
  • How long have you been teaching?
  • Are you enjoying it?

Godspeed on your education journey. It’s a beautiful fulfilling career!

Mary Catherine

The response brought a smile. The world is not that small!

Great to hear from you! So appreciated approach to blogging, such a responsibility!

It happened (regarding the exchange program), I teach in Ukraine now. From the start of the year, children went to school, then the decision was changed and we connected via Zoom. But now we again teach at school, the new statement appeared a few weeks ago. I teach 1-4 grades, kids are so active in these ages, I guess you know it! And I love their curiosity, that’s why I chose my field and never regretted it. I’ve been teaching for 6 years, hope I won’t face emotional burnout 🙂

Keep up the great work and I’d love to hear from you, Mary!

Regards,

Peter

MC Fairy surrounded by raining cats and dogs.
MC Fairy shoveling snow.

Peter, all of us teachers can certainly relate to your reflection on hoping not to burnout emotionally. It is such an exciting and fulfilling career, but it does have a high level of stress. I think the most important thing to remember is that we do what we can and then have to let go and trust the universe to guide and watch over us.

Thank-you Peter, for sharing the link from Climacell that provided a clear and engaging listing of easy weather science experiments for elementary grades. Given climate change plus the natural change of seasons (here in Canada we are entering winter) these experiments allow children to extensively investigate many aspects of weather.

To take it a step further it would be great for children to research the topic of climate change.

The following is a listing of links that can support climate change research:

There are so many more available online. A very rich topic to investigate. I really want to highlight this link in particular as it has many interesting subtopics with corresponding links.

Enjoy friends and thanks again Peter!